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A Few Showers

Heritage Conservation and Sustainable Buildings Awards

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The City of Subiaco Heritage Conservation and Sustainable Buildings Awards recognise individuals and businesses for their valuable work and achievements in conserving and enhancing the city’s rich cultural heritage and their commitment to a sustainable community. 

For the first time, the city has included a new Sustainable buildings category to recognise excellence in sustainable design, construction and operation. The winners of the 2016 Awards were announced at an awards ceremony on Monday 16 May at Subiaco Library.

Award winners

Conservation of a heritage place

91 Hensman Road, Subiaco
The judges considered this project as an exemplar of what can be achieved with a State Registered Place. Conservation works have been undertaken with a remarkable attention to detail and have included retaining and conserving as much of the original fabric as possible while also acknowledging and embracing the patina of age. The re-configuration of the original internal spaces has been undertaken with exceptional care and minimal intervention.

The application of sound conservation practices in accordance with the principles of the Burra Charter and a respect for the original building has led to an exceptional conservation outcome.
The architect for this project was Nash and Ghersinich Architects.

Large scale additions and alterations to a heritage place

23 Railway Road, Subiaco
The judges described this as an integrated development where the opportunity has been taken to embrace a relatively modest scaled heritage building and develop the remainder of the site in a highly respectful but modern manner, which provides a smooth transition between old and new. The multi-level mixed use addition has been carefully designed to accommodate a change of scale and form, connecting with the heritage building but also pulling back and providing it with the space it deserves. Acknowledging heritage values through the use of reflective design idioms, it tips a hat to the past in a respectful and considered way.
The architect for this project was MJA Studio.

Additions and alterations to a heritage place

19 Redfern Street, Subiaco
Located on a corner site the judges consider the addition as discretely located in a manner that is highly respectful of both streetscapes. It is a quiet, well detailed intervention which provides modern living spaces in a way that allows the original form and use of the building to be readily understood.
Adaptation of the former corner store for office use and continued use of the extended rear sections for the original purpose of residential accommodation has enabled the original design to move into the twenty-first century in a meaningful way.
The architect for this project was Colin Moore Architects.

Adaptation of a heritage place

91 Hensman Road, Subiaco
The judges considered this former maternity hospital, now family home, to be an outstanding example of the adaptation of a heritage building for a completely new use. Treated with a great level of care and attention to detail, with as little intervention as possible, the works have retained a high degree of original fabric. There is clear evidence of a thoughtful and clever collaboration between architect, interior designer and owner, which has achieved the challenging transition from maternity hospital to a twenty-first century family home without obscuring the original design intent.
The architect for this project was Nash and Ghersinich Architects.

Sustainable buildings

199 Hamersley Road, Subiaco
The judges considered this as a model for the potential and achievability of cost efficient sustainable housing in the inner suburbs of Perth. The house goes far beyond the typical box ticking exercise of current ratings systems for residential housing. The house has been designed using passive design principles including careful orientation, appropriate shading devices, significant use of insulation, the use of thermal mass and extensive cross ventilation.

Both heating and cooling is managed with the use of a solar air heater in winter and fans circulating cool basement air through the house in summer. These features and the use of ceiling fans have negated the need to install any air-conditioning systems. Water tanks are used for toilet flushing and a washing machines and a photovoltaic system provides all the houses electricity needs.

A majority of the houses structure and cladding has been prefabricated offsite to reduce material waste during construction Edible gardens have been planted and maintained for the occupants use and the house has been designed using living in place principles allowing the owners to live in and maintain their independence as they age with the house.

The large number of the general public and students who have viewed and studied the house during open days demonstrates the leadership the house has shown and the interest by the public in seeing housing pushed beyond the status quo.
The architects for this project were Paul Wellington and Elizabeth Karol Architects.

 

Commendations

Conservation of a heritage place

10-12 Campbell Street, Subiaco
6 Duke Street, Subiaco

Additions and alterations to a heritage place

15 Harvey Road, Shenton Park (Sam Martin Building Design)
86 Onslow Road, Shenton Park (Sam Martin Building Design)

Adaptation of a heritage place

Hackett Hall, University of Western Australia (SCHIN Architects)

New buildings in a heritage streetscape

263 Heytesbury Road, Subiaco

Sustainable buildings

588 Hay Street, Subiaco (Cameron Chisholm Nicol)

 

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